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Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Bone Broth

February 8, 2014

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Bone Broth

If you haven’t read FAQ’s and Things To Keep In Mind about Feeding Babies yet, that would be a great place to start first!

One of the most satisfying things to feed my babies (besides mama’s milk!) has been bone broth. If you have never read Broth is Beautiful before – take a peek! You will be so proud of yourself for getting bone broth into not only your kids – but YOURSELF!

Bone broth made from healthy pastured cows and chickens is extremely nourishingfull of vital minerals, and protein rich, digestive assisting, gelatin that you just can’t get anywhere else.

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Bone Broth

I have found that creating a taste palate for bone broth in my kids has helped immensely down the road for having healthy eaters of beautiful veggie soups, and broth straight out of the sippy cup when they feel under the weather. My big girls (age 4 and 2) drink it right out of the pot with a sprinkle of sea salt. I can’t tell you how many times I have relied on just a cup of broth as a lunchtime staple – especially during the busy toddler years when they just don’t want to sit and eat – they want to play!

So right around 5 months I start with little tastes of bone broth with a sprinkle of sea salt. It gets messier than I want to deal with on a spoon right at first, so I use a little dropper or syringe! I usually have one lying around left over from little herbal bottles of chamomile. You can also go to your local pharmacy and ask them for a medicine syringe – ours gives them out for free. Just a tablespoon or so right in the beginning. Within a few times of trying it, all 3 of my girls now have been so in love with it they literally grab for the syringe to put it in their mouth!

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Bone Broth

I don’t always have jars of bone broth in the fridge to pour from – it usually goes right from the pot into making soup, or into the deep freezer until I need it. So while I’m straining out my broth, I usually freeze up an ice cube tray or two with broth so I can pop out cubes for baby as I need. DO NOT warm up the broth in the microwave – it will kill all the good stuff! Use the stove top, OR I like to just put it in a little container in my bottle warmer!
Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Bone Broth

From there the possibilities are endless! I use bone broth as the base for pureeing all of my meats and veggies for baby. Veggie soup purees are a meal staple in our house, not only because they are so easy to make, but because it is a great way to get bone broth in my family. I start baby tasting simple pea soups, squash soups, etc at some point between 6-8 months. It is such a nice meal staple to get baby’s taste palate used to so that they can continue to eat these great soups into toddlerhood and beyond.

So HERE is my method for bone broth making! Give it a try and let me know how it goes! Remember – it can take up to 15 attempts of a new food for baby to accept the new food! This is the same for all first foods! If baby makes a funny face at first, don’t give up! They are getting used to new tastes, textures, and feelings in their mouth! Give them a chance to learn how this feels, how to use their tongue, etc! Watch baby for a week during those first introductions. If you see any weird diaper action going on, redness around the mouth, or rashes on the skin, you will want to stop. Try the broth again in a month and see what happens.

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Bone Broth

Feeding Babies Real Food 101

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: FAQ’s and Thoughts to Keep in Mind

January 22, 2014

I have spent a lot of time over the last few months putting together some tips that have helped me learn how to feed my babies in a traditional, nourishing way.

Wait a minute…”learn” how to feed my babies?

Yes.

Feeding my babies in a traditional, nourishing way was very foreign territory to me. I grew up in up an environment where toxic baby cereals are considered a good first food. In fact my first born had baby cereal as her first taste of solid food. When she was constipated a week later I trashed it. I had no idea where to start from there – but I knew I didn’t want to start with that. There was very limited information with details for this type A personality to follow 5 years ago when I had my first baby.

I hope this detailed Feeding Nourished Babies Series will help you wade through mainstream medicine’s processed baby food recommendations so you can make your own decisions on what is best to feed *your* baby to nourish their growing minds and bodies!

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: FAQ’s and Thoughts to Keep in MindSo here are some important things to keep in mind as I’m talking introducing nourishing solids to baby, and some FAQ’s that I usually come across! I hope this is helpful – and feel free to post questions in the comments!

  • HERE is a general idea of what I have followed for feeding my babies – it is basically the WAPF guidelines for feeding babies.
  • I have started my girls with tastes of nourishing solids between 4-5 months. You don’t have to though! All three of my girls now have sat up by 4 months! They had very great head control early as well. This is not the same for all babies, and if your baby isn’t sitting well or doesn’t have great head control then I would wait. Follow your mama gut instincts and start solids when you and baby are ready!
  • When I started tastes of solids around 4-5 months it was exactly that – *tastes*usually no more than a teaspoon or two until they were closer to 6 months. It takes baby a week or two to figure that tongue out – I look at the “feedings” as oral practice for learning the coordination of how to eat, learning how to sit at the table with the family and be together, and share a meal!
  • Out of all the “first foods” that I mention from egg yolks to avocadao, to gentle veggies and bone broth, my babies were never getting the same thing day after day. In those first months some days they got a “feeding” once or twice a day, and some days they didn’t get any at all. When I introduced a new food I would give it to them one or two times and then not give it to them again for a week so I could watch for reactions. This is one reason I liked started around 4-5 months with the foods – it takes a while to get things introduced! Relax! Don’t force it all down!
  • Be sure to change up textures and tastes! One of the reasons I feel my big girls are not “picky” eaters (I honestly can’t think of one food they won’t eat!) is because I never “babied” them when it came to food. I’m not a strainer, or flavor masker. If they made a face a new texture or taste – we kept trying. I don’t mask veggie flavors with apples or something else “sweet.” I don’t strain or over puree. I make the food a fairly smooth consistency for the first month maybe, but not forever.
  • It can take up to 15 attempts of a new food for baby to accept the new food! This is the same for all first foods! If baby makes a funny face at first, don’t give up! They are getting used to new tastes, textures, and feelings in their mouth! Give them a chance to learn how this feels, how to use their tongue, etc!
  • Watch baby for a week during those first introductions. If you see any weird diaper action going on, redness around the mouth, or rashes on the skin, you will want to stop. Try the food again in a month and see what happens.

So talk to me! And keep the questions coming!

*PLEASE NOTE: Baby’s first foods can be a very heated topic. Please let’s play nice and respect every mama’s choice to start solids when she feels is right for her baby. I am a STICKLER on this!

Feeding Babies Real Food 101

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Coconut Butter

January 22, 2014

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Coconut Butter

If you haven’t read FAQ’s and Things To Keep In Mind about Feeding Babies yet, that would be a great place to start first!

Coconut butter is something I didn’t find until my first born was close to 1 year old. She just loved it, and after learning more about coconut butter, I made it a part of my second and now third born’s menu of first food introductions.

Coconut butter is basically the “meat” of the coconut in a pureed/buttered fashion. It is more than just the oil of the coconut – though it does contain that. It is like eating a coconut! It is very palatable, so unlike taking straight coconut oil on a spoon, the coconut butter is very kid friendly.

Coconut oil, like human breastmilk, contains lauric acid which helps the body fight viral and bacterial infections and makes immune systems strong. It is full of medium chain fatty acids and friendly fats that are great for brain development and health.

As baby gets older into toddlerhood you can use coconut butter for so many things other than just off the spoon! I often add melted coconut butter to my big girls’ smoothies, yogurt, or soaked oatmeal. I also spread it on gluten free pancakes or apple slices!

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Coconut ButterI do buy the Artisana Coconut Butter from my local health food store. You can make coconut butter if you have a high powered blender! (On my someday wish list!)

Here is how I prep coconut butter for my babies:

Coconut Butter for Baby

Coconut butter is essentially pureed coconut meat. It provides great healthy fat for your baby.
Prep Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: homemade baby food
Author: Renee - www.raisinggenerationnourished.com

Ingredients

  • 1-2 tsp coconut butter

Instructions

  • Melt the coconut butter (NOT in a microwave though!). I like to use my bottle warmer! I put the coconut butter in a little container that fits in the bottle warmer and let it warm up a few minutes! You could also just put the whole jar in a bowl of hot water and it will get soft and melt. If you live in a warm climate your coconut butter may be nice and soft already!
  • Add a splash or two of breastmilk, coconut oil, or water to the melted coconut butter to make it the consistency that you want, and serve to baby.

Tips:

  • It can take up to 15 attempts of a new food for baby to accept the new food! This is the same for all first foods! If baby makes a funny face at first, don’t give up! They are getting used to new tastes, textures, and feelings in their mouth! Give them a chance to learn how this feels, how to use their tongue, etc!
  • Watch baby for a week during those first introductions of the coconut butter. If you see any weird diaper action going on, redness around the mouth, or rashes on the skin, you will want to stop – this is the same with any first foods introductions. Try the coconut butter again in a month and see what happens.
  • THIS is a great first foods chart to give you an idea of what to follow when choosing first foods for your baby if you are wanting to follow the WAPF guidelines for feeding babies.
  • Read THIS for common FAQ’s and thoughts to keep in mind about feeding babies!

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Coconut ButterHave you tried coconut butter with your littles before? What do you like to use it for?

Feeding Babies Real Food 101

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Avocado

January 20, 2014

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Avocado

If you haven’t read FAQ’s and Things To Keep In Mind about Feeding Babies yet, that would be a great place to start first!

Mashed up avocado has been one of my girls’ favorite baby foods – that has transitioned to be a favorite food in general as they grow into toddlerhood!

Both of my big girls will eat avocado right out of the shell with a spoon to this day – that makes this mama very happy!

Avocados are full of nourishing, filling fats and are very gentle to digest for most babies. As baby ages into toddlerhood, creating a taste palate for avocado can transition to them loving to dip veggies in guacamole, or spread avocado mash on sandwiches or crackers.

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Avocado

Here is how I prep avocados for my babies to taste!

Avocado for baby

Avocados are full of nourishing, filling fats and are very gentle to digest for most babies. 
Prep Time5 mins
Total Time5 mins
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: homemade baby food
Author: Renee - www.raisinggenerationnourished.com

Ingredients

  • Ripe avocado

Instructions

  • Scoop out a couple teaspoons of avocado into a bowl.
  • Use a fork to mash it up and add splashes of breastmilk or melted coconut oil (could do water if you wish) to make it the consistency/smoothness you want. (You could also use a blender if you wish)

Tips:

  • I don’t batch up avocado. It turns brown with air unless you squirt some lemon on it, and I don’t like having citrus in my baby’s foods for a while. I do use the Ziploc Air Lock Vaccuum to keep the cut avocado fresh though! It works great! Between my other daughters, myself, and the baby we do usually go through a whole avocado in one sitting, but if I only need the little bit for baby I air lock it up and it stays great for a couple days in the fridge! You can also use any leftover avocado to make guacamole for the bigger kids (or mama!) or spread on sandwiches.
  • It can take up to 15 attempts of a new food for baby to accept the new food! This is the same for all first foods! If baby makes a funny face at first, don’t give up! They are getting used to new tastes, textures, and feelings in their mouth! Give them a chance to learn how this feels, how to use their tongue, etc!
  • Watch baby for a week during those first introductions of the avocado. If you see any weird diaper action going on, redness around the mouth, or rashes on the skin, you will want to stop – this is the same with any first foods introductions. Try the avocado again in a month and see what happens.
  • THIS is a great first foods chart to give you an idea of what to follow when choosing first foods for your baby if you are wanting to follow the WAPF guidelines for feeding babies.
  • Read THIS for common FAQ’s and thoughts to keep in mind about feeding babies!

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Avocado

Have you tried avocado with your littles? What did they think?

Feeding Babies Real Food 101

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Pastured Egg Yolk

January 17, 2014

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Pastured Egg Yolk
 

If you haven’t read FAQ’s and Things To Keep In Mind about Feeding Babies yet, that would be a great place to start first!

What?! You are going to feed your baby eggs??

I can’t tell you how often I have heard that phrase in the last few years! And yet, if you look and new mamas around the globe, giving the yolks of eggs to babies as first foods is common practice.

The yolks of eggs from chickens that have been on pasture to eat grass and bugs is extremely nourishing! You can’t pack more punch in to such a small package!

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Pastured Egg Yolk

Babies don’t have very big bellies! If you have been reading material from me very long, you will find that my mantra is always – make every bite count. Why do we start babies on nutrient-less foods like processed cereals? This practice makes no sense. If babies don’t even have the enzymes to break down grains until well over the age of 1 year old, then why are we introducing them to baby cereal so young? This sets our children up for a myriad of gut issues.

The Weston Price Foundation recommends egg yolks from pastured chickens to be introduced as early as 4 months old. I have enjoyed seeing my sweet babes yolky faces as soon as they are sitting up well, and it feels so good to know how nourished their bodies and brains are!

Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Pastured Egg Yolk

A couple of notes before I show you how to prep those yolks for your baby. First, ONLY the yolks before age 1. I will be showing you how to soft boil your egg so you can easily get the yolk separated away to feed to baby. Second, I want to be sure to mention that I am not a doctor. First and foremost you need to follow your mama gut instinct – if you don’t feel comfortable giving your baby a yolk, then by all means – it is your baby! Don’t do it! Following the WAPF guidelines for feeding babies is what has worked for my family, and I want to share how to do it if this is how you want to feed your babies! And third, always nurse before food! In those first stages of introducing solids to baby around 4-6 months, breastmilk is always first priority. If you are formula feeding same thing.

All set? Ok! Lets soft boil those eggs!

Pastured Egg Yolk for Baby

Egg yolk is amazingly nourishing for baby. The healthy fats from a pastured chicken are so beneficial.
Prep Time5 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American
Keyword: eggs for baby, homemade baby food
Servings: 1 serving
Author: Renee - www.raisinggenerationnourished.com

Ingredients

  • 1 pastured egg

Instructions

  • Fill a small or medium pot that has a lid with water and bring to a boil.
  • Using a slotted spoon, lower your egg into the boiling water and put the lid on the pot.
  • Set your timer for 5 minutes.
  • After the 5 minutes, use your slotted spoon to take the egg out, and run the egg under cold water for about 30 seconds.
  • Tap the top of the egg to crack the shell and pull away the white.
  • Pierce the yolk with your spoon and scoop it out into a bowl.
  • Sprinkle sea salt and/or grate some grassfed liver over top the yolk and serve to baby.

Tips:

  • UPDATE! I recently started using my steamer for soft and hard boiling eggs – and oh! SO so (so!) easy! You must try it! On mine it is about 11 minutes for soft boiled and 15 for hard. This steamer also has 2 baskets so you can steam your eggs on the bottom and then some peas or carrots to puree for baby on the top! Yeah!
  • This is not a make ahead food unfortunately 😉 I always served this when I knew I would be home and had the time – usually did it when we were sitting down for dinner (this also introduces the routine of sitting down as a family for the dinner meal!) , or before bedtime. I do a lot of baby food batch ups for the freezer (such as meats and veggies), but this is just one that is made to order. It is worth the small amount of time to get that nourishment into baby though! And while the 6 minutes is ticking that is plenty of time to change a diaper, put dinner on the stove, or even have a nursing/feeding/snuggle session.
  • Watch baby for a week during those first introductions of the yolk. If you see any weird diaper action going on, redness around the mouth, or rashes on the skin, you will want to stop – this is the same with any first foods introductions. Try the yolk again in a month and see what happens.
  • It can take up to 15 attempts of a new food for baby to accept the new food! This is the same for all first foods! If baby makes a funny face at first, don’t give up! They are getting used to new tastes, textures, and feelings in their mouth! Give them a chance to learn how this feels, how to use their tongue, etc.
  • As baby gets older, you can hard boil your eggs, mush up the yolk with a back of a fork, and add some breastmilk to make a thicker paste if you wish. Sometimes I add the crumbled hard boiled egg yolk to plain, whole milk yogurt.
  • THIS is a great first foods chart to give you an idea of what to follow when choosing first foods for your baby if you are wanting to follow the WAPF guidelines for feeding babies.
  • Read THIS for common FAQ’s and thoughts to keep in mind about feeding babies!
  • Feeding Nourished Babies Series :: Pastured Egg Yolk

So tell me about your baby’s first foods! If you can figure out how to post a picture on here we want to see those yolky faces! Or post them to my facebook! I wanna see!

*PLEASE NOTE: Baby’s first foods can be a very heated topic. Please lets play nice and respect every mama’s choice to start solids when she feels is right for her baby. I am a STICKLER on this!